We Need to Stop Treating God as a Historical Memory

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Instead of asking yourself “What would Jesus do?,” start asking yourself “What is Jesus doing?”

Jesus is alive and the Holy Spirit lives inside of us. Too often we consider Jesus as a past memory instead of a present reality.

Christians often talk about God in the past tense by referencing Biblical accounts, or the future tense by discussing the book of Revelation and prophecies, but rarely in the present tense—in the real, existing, moments of today. Too often, we forget that God is alive and present right here, right now.

So practice the discipline of realizing that God is present–in THIS exact moment, wherever you are in this moment of time, God is loving you. He’s here. He’s alive. He’s real. He’s moving.

We can take comfort in the historical accounts of the Bible and the prophetic promises of the future, but both are superficial if we don’t understand and accept the profound reality of God living, impacting, shaping, influencing, and guiding our life right now.

Imagine God right next to you. Picture God helping you through your current struggles and happily enjoying your current successes. Believe it not because it’s a comfort, but because it’s a reality.

Six Reasons Americans Still Need Christianity

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In a secularized society obsessed with consumerism, entertainment, and modernization, Christianity is often portrayed as being old-fashioned, irrelevant, and useless, but it still serves some very valuable and profound purposes. Here’s why Americans still need it:

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Seven Lies About Christianity

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Stephen Mattson:

7 Lies About Christianity Which Christians Believe

Originally posted on Stephen Mattson:

My recent piece was featured on Sojourners, and as of a few days ago it was their most popular web piece of all time! It garnered lots of interesting discussion. What do you think?

Dennis Kuvaev/Shutterstock

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7 Ways I Would Do Christianity Differently

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Faith is a journey, a Pilgrim’s Progress filled with mistakes, learning, humble interactions, and life-changing events. Here are a few things I would do differently if I could go back and start over:

1. I wouldn’t worry about having the right answers.

There’s a misconception that the Bible is the Ultimate Answer Book and Christianity is a divine encyclopedia presenting the solutions to life’s biggest questions. In reality, the Christian faith is about a relationship with Christ instead of an academic collection of right or wrong doctrines.

Rather than wasting time, energy, and resources on superficial theological issues — I would focus more of getting to know Jesus. Never let a desire for “being right” obstruct your love for Christ.

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Stereotyping Ministry: The Inner-City

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I used to lead and organize inner-city mission trips. Churches, youth groups, non-profit organizations, and well-intentioned philanthropists would excitedly arrive within the diverse and fast-paced world of Chicago and enthusiastically dive into whatever tasks we gave them. The work they volunteered for made a huge difference in people’s lives, but more importantly, it dramatically challenged — and changed — their own way of thinking about urban ministry.

For years “The City” has been the pet project of Christians throughout America. Millions of mission trips have been made to homeless shelters, food pantries, and poor neighborhoods, all in an effort to “clean up,” “rehabilitate” and “evangelize” in Christ’s name. Unfortunately, the inner-city isn’t as stereotypical as we want it to be, and our missionary zeal can often cause more harm than good.

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Remembering Jesus…Today.

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As followers of Christ we need to make an intentional effort to realize that Jesus exists in the present.

Christians often talk about God in the past tense by referencing Biblical accounts, or the future tense by discussing the book of Revelation and prophecies, but rarely in the present tense—in the real, existing, moments of today. Too often, we forget that God is alive and present right here, right now.

Instead of asking yourself “What would Jesus do?,” start asking yourself “What is Jesus doing?”

Jesus is alive and the Holy Spirit lives inside of us. Too often we consider Jesus as a past memory instead of a present reality

5 Things You Should Know Before Becoming A Christian

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1) Christ is perfect but “Christianity” is not. Don’t mistake Christian Culture as God, they aren’t the same thing. Churches, pastors, theologians, and other believers will inevitably fail you, but Jesus never will.

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Update

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Hey everyone! As you’ve probably noticed the blog has been a little quieter than usua. I just wanted to let you know that within the next few weeks things should be picking up again.

Lately, my wife’s grandfather died, and with a few other big unexpected family events occurring within the last few weeks things have been chaotic, busy, and extremely tiring. I decided to slow down for a while and regather some energy.

But things are starting to get back to normal and I’m looking forward to blogging regularly again soon.

In the meantime, thanks for all of the prayer and support, and I appreciate all of the comments, reads, shares, and interaction you’ve shown! Have a great week!

-Steve

The Forgotten Victims of Society’s Obsession with Body Image: The Elderly

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When it comes to helping people with self-esteem, health, and respect concerning their body image—and the image of the others—we often rightfully focus on helping kids, teenagers, and young adults.

They face body-shaming, bullying, and extreme marketing and advertising pressure to fulfill impossible standards. After years of being continuously bombarded with millions of—often photoshopped—images of what perfect humans are “supposed to look like,” our youth culture has become unprepared to deal with the antithesis of the flawless body: the natural process of growing old.

This has created a generation that’s become uncomfortable with facing the existence of aging—often perceiving older people as having less value and worth. Although this truth will never be verbally admitted or acknowledged, our corporate actions—or lack thereof — reveal a callous, apathetic, and ignorant attitude.

Ironically, our society’s obsession with body shaming and body image has resulted in the elderly being one of our culture’s most devastated victims.

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